Thought-Provoking

I’m on vacation for a couple of weeks and not writing much, but I read a tidbit in my friend, Charles Wood’s, daily missive and thought it worth reprinting here.  Take a moment and look at it…

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     A valued fried passed this article along to me, and I thought it made a point so valid that I ought to share it with my readers.
“A week or two ago I was sent an article.  It raised a question that is changing some of my thinking. He says that earlier in his life he taught in a ministry school where his students were truly hungry for God. He quoted a statement to describe the history of Christianity; it goes like this:
“Christianity started in Palestine as a fellowship; it moved to Greece and became a philosophy; it moved to Italy and became an institution; it moved to Europe and became a culture; it came to America and became an enterprise adding that an enterprise was a business.
“After a few moments Martha, an 18 year old, the youngest student in the class, raised her hand. Acknowledging her she asked, ‘A business? But isn’t it supposed to be a body?’ I responded in the affirmative. She continued, ‘But when a body becomes a business, isn’t that a prostitute?’

    “The room went dead silent. For several seconds no one moved or spoke. We were stunned, afraid to make a sound because the presence of God had flooded into the room, and we knew we were on holy ground. All I could think in those sacred moments was, ‘I have never thought of that.’ But I didn’t dare say anything at that moment. God had taken over the class.

    “This question is changing my life. ‘When a body becomes a business, isn’t that a prostitute?’ There is only one answer to her question and that is ‘Yes.’
“The American Church , tragically, is heavily populated by people who do not love God. How can we love Him? We don’t even really know Him. Too many Church people have come to God because of what they were told He would do for us. They were promised that He would bless them in life and take them to heaven after death. They have made the Kingdom of God into a business, merchandising His anointing. This should not be.

    ” We are commanded to love God and are called to be the Bride of Christ–that’s pretty intimate stuff. We are supposed to be His lovers. How can we love someone we don’t even know?
“Are we lovers or prostitutes? A lover does what she does because she loves, but a prostitute pretends to love only as long as it pays. I wonder what would happen if God stopped paying us. What if he stopped blessing with what we want when we want it?
God does bless us with the gifts of a loving Father. The issue here is the condition of the heart. Do I question God when I am not healed? Do I think if I just had more faith I could force him to do what I desire?! Without faith we cannot please God, but why do we want to please God? To be blessed or because we want to be a joy to him?!
“‘Oh, My Lord, forgive my presumptions upon you. I love you and do not want to be a prostitute but a lover of you for who you truly are, my lover! Amen.’” 

5 thoughts on “Thought-Provoking

  1. Kansas Bob

    I am sitting here thinking about how much sense “the church as a business” sounds to my head.. I guess that is the problem.. the church was never meant to about about the head.. it was meant to be about the heart.

    Reply
  2. Xavier Gomez

    Taking the ministry or priesthood as “business” was prevelant in Ezekiel’s time… so much so they could not even discren it when God’s presence had actually left the sanctuary. A similar influence toay is “market-driven” spirituality. It is subtle, postmodern, emergent, emerging and the “buisness” is redefining kingdom driven life and spirituality. One thing is for sure we need to re-examine result-orientated success in the context of a biblical worldview.

    Reply

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